Professional Inclusion

 
 
 
Home> Inclusion> Professional Inclusion
 

Most trades and professions are accessible to little people. However, they should avoid taking a job that requires a large number of movements or significant muscle strength. We find little people practicing different trades: accountants, switchboard operators, psychologists, counselors, remedial educators, microbiologists, evaluators, facilitators, and even truck drivers. The professional choice should be made according to the tastes, interests, and abilities of the person. We strongly encourage little people to pursue their academic training at the university level because it will facilitate their access to the labour market.

The job search has difficulties for all and complications are increased when one is struck by apparent shortcomings. It is, in part, up to little people to prove their skills and educate their prospective employer to the issues confronting them.

For many years, the AQPPT has been striving for the inclusion of little people by:

  • educating employers on the potential of its members.
  • opening its members' eyes to their own work skills.
  • debunking the condition of little people. For instance, still too many employers liken limitations to disease, which involves frequent absences.
  • assisting little people in their efforts if they feel they are victims of discriminatory measures and want to file a complaint with the Human Rights Commission.
  • informing employers and little people of opportunities for government funding (to adapt a job or qualify for a work integration contract).
  • informing its members of existing resources in the field of employment, such as workforce external services (SEMO), which specializes in the placement of persons with disabilities.
  • participating in workshops and seminars on the labor market.
For more information or to get personal help, please consult the members’ section (see page Participating in the AQPPT under the section About Us).

 

 
 

© 2011 AQPPT - Translated by George Bravo and Judy Murphy